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  • GABBA.TV is a creative studio, operating between Sao Paulo, London and Lisbon. always seeking to create innovative experiences that immerse and surprise in completely unexpected ways. Creative Director Jaygo Bloom works on static, cinematic, responsive and sonic media and has more than a decade of experience expanding boundaries, redefining expectations and exciting audiences worldwide.

  • The agency works with public and private cultural institutions, record companies, immersive events and festivals. Creative practice is expressed in a wide field of design including video, live performance, installation, digital production, visual identity, typography, album artwork and quickly integrates in collaborations with musicians, architects, dancers, cinematography and graphic design.  

  • We support a practice that tends to enrich the contemporary visual culture and addresses each new project in a transverse and responsive way. We advocate the need to listen, share and work together to produce experiences that take into account locations and audiences. The studio favours a unique graphic bias, serving the message to be communicated and most of the time, finding relevant answers by asking the right questions.


  • Interviewed by Art Critic Mathias Jansson. As part of a series to illustrate the genesis and evolution of a phenomenon that changed the way game-based art is being created, experienced, and discussed today.

  • Interview 01


  • Intervied by NEoN 2012 Digital Arts Festival. Jaygo Bloom creator of ‘Bombaze’ an indie mobile app developed exclusively for the festival. In this interview we ask how it works, what it does, and what were his motives.

  • Interview 02


  • Interviewed by the V2 Institute for Unstable Media curator, Michelle Kasprzak. A disscussion for Vague Terrain, on the subjects of live cinema and realtime graphical performance.

  • Interview 03




  • Art: Design: Identity: Performance

  • Jaygo Bloom - Creative Director 2010/2018. Producing the visual strategy and identity for live performance in partnership with seminal British Techno, Planetary Assault Systems and artist Luke Slater.

  • Since 2001 GABBA.TV has been producing creative event strategies performing live for Techno festivals worldwide, developing custom coded content and innovative approaches to video mapping, event projection, live feed cinema, led multi screen setup, motion tracking and realtime media for live performance.

  • Art: Design: Identity

  • Festival Forte is a festival of music and electronic art, held at the castle of Montemor-O-Velho Portugal, coordinated by a visionary collective of artists, musicians, artists, architects and dreamers. Restless digital natives who refuse to be labeled, dedicated to creating immersive social experiences.

  • Jaygo Bloom is responsible for the direction and development of the festivals generative art program and the realisation of generative sculptural works on a large scale, defined by two extremes: night and day / light and shadow. This guideline informs each of the responsive social spaces of the festival garden, each space changes dynamically, autonomously, exploring the algorithmic generation.

  • Each year, five thousand visitors from around the world experience a fluctuating and changing landscape of experimental dynamics, along with dark techno beats and visual performances, each setting the trend for a new conversation in digital and analog space.
















  • Performance

  • The 1st edition of Time Warp Brazil. 16000 people, 48 hours ..

  • no show, these days is just about the artist or the music or the look or the lights. What defines a great show is how all these different production values come together. It is about cleverly integrating the audio with the visual, the lights with the sounds, the music with the vibes. Immersive experiences at GABBA.TV reach for a blurring of the lines, disrupting the way we think and adapting new experiences that are both analog and digital at the same time.

  • Cave 2.0 - A commission for the Sao paulo based events company Entourage. The ambitious delivery was a high-tech conceptual proposal entitled for futuristic scenographic installations, creating an immersive all-night experience. GABBA.TV was responsible for a gigantic led panel and the post-apocalyptic live-visuals of Cave 2.0 - a mega club with dark and industrial settings and a cavernous ceiling.














  • Art: Identity: Performance


  • A creative partnership for director Jaygo Bloom, that started in 2003 from the 3rd floor an old warehouse in the center of Glasgow, Scotland.

  • In 2003, together with a few friends we founded a collective, we rented out a dilapidated, old warehouse and appropriately named it ’The Chateau’. We used this as a studio space, and from it hosted art shows and events, drawing upon the artistic talents that came to the city via the art school. The top floor was rented out by an edgy, four piece art rock band, they played at our events, held parties and then literally, overnight became the phenomenon that is‘Franz Ferdinand’

  • GABBA.TV created and performed the video content for all Franz Ferdinand’s first early acts. Initially this was for the back rooms of pubs and as the band became more popular for larger venues, including the legendary 'Heaven' Nightclub and the O2 Brixton Academy in London.

  • It was in 2009 when they asked if I could develop and produce a series of superwide visuals to accompany their World Tour..

  • Art: Design: Identity: Performance

  • A GABBA.TV residency for the city of Glasgow and its seriously glamorous, dark and dirty electro-club night - 'Death Disco'.

  • Following the motif of the Andy Warhol Factory where it was possible for everyone to be famous for five minutes of their lives. Our strategy for monthly poster design and live performance video content was to invite dance floor players to a private photo and party session, convincing them to perform naturally, ambiguously and surprisingly for our cameras. The content we captured became our monthly source content and visual strategy for all static and motion advertising, including club visuals.
     

  • Our strategy was extremely successful and we implemented this concept for more than three years, winning a grand prize for the best marketing strategy in the Scottish Award Events.
     

  • Art: Design: Identity

  • Jaygo Bloom is resident designer for the Mote Evolver record label and its artists including Roog Unit, Psyk, LSD and Planetary Assault Systems.  

  • Mote Evolver is the record label of DJ and producer Luke Slater. The label supports a number of interactive artists who question the frontier areas of techno, dub and ambient. A common idea behind all the releases is an experimental approach and combination of sound, art and design, this is not only apparent in music but also visible in artwork, cover design and live performances.

  • The aesthetic focus of the collective seal is rhythmic techno-electronic music, dark, alternating between sound landscape and introspection.  











  • Art: Design: Interactive: Performance

  • Invited to present new work for the main gallery of the spectacular DCA building in Scotland. Dundee Contemporary Arts Centre, to coincide with the Discovery Film Festival. Jaygo Bloom presented the solo show — 'Arcade' an immersive event that reinterpreted key works relevant to the history of fine art practice.

  • What the gallery wanted to realise in so doing was a synthesis of discipline where the conceptual and material properties guiding by the original work of art were subtracted from their primary context and synthesised into new spatial, light, projective and interactive qualities.

  • "Inspiration for me always starts with a leap backwards into the past and reaches far into the future. When responding to an existing work of art and recreating it in physical space or incorporating it into a different medium we begin to project the future."










  • Art: Design: Identity

  • Film and sonic media elements created for the Salisbury Museum collection and exhibition "Ancient Landscapes" (2017).

  • A series of animated 3D photogrammetric models created from data from images captured during field recordings in response to ancient sites megaliths of England.

  • This identity included a multi-screen artwork installation titled "Heavy Weight Dub Plates”, presented in loop, in eternal rotation.
     

  • Art: Design: Performance

  • Documenatation of an eight week residency for Pixelazo Electronic Arts festival in Bogota and Medellin. Colombia. Marrakattak is a Pan American, percussive audiovisual instrument created out of a set of midi modified marracas. Presented live to the people of 'Communa 13' to perform with during a Pixelazo outdoor event.

  • Marrakattak combined Aztec, Zapotec and Mayan imagery alongside 8bit sounds and footage from our Colombian road trip. Designed to create digital encounters, sharing skills and knowledge with the indigenous communities of Colombia. A modified instrument, a familiar activity nut with unfamiliar results - Fused with a glitch based, Western sensibility.

  • Workshops and performances alongside Pixelazo and the VJ collecitve Pointless Creations in the lush rainforests of Colombia.

  • Art: Design: Interactive

  • ‘Zapp You’re Pregnant’ is a series of video-mapped, interactive, narratives responding to the politics and practice of child birth. The installation is permanently included in the arts collection 'Birthrites', Kings College. London.

  • For a period of six weeks alongside Senior Vice President of the Royal College of Gynecology, Dr Jim Dornan. Jaygo Bloom examined the role and reliance of technology within contemporary birthing procedures. The artwork demonstrates an alternative view to the birthing process; one which paradoxically is driven by technology, but at the same time exposes the lucid and often dreamstates of the expectant mothers.

  • Research for 'Zapp You're Pregnant' explored the entropic disorder associated with alchemical and scientific motif, drawing comparisons with ancient notions of rebirth and transformation.

  • Art: Performance

  • The idea of the mouth and the mantra. The Nothing, the Nothing that becomes and the Nothing that is.

  • In collaboration with The DanceHouse, Glasgow. O:.O:.O:. comprises a series of choreographed scenes based on the composition of an Alexander Calder stabiles, where the static body strikes poses and holds the forms within the painting (improvising within an imposed modernist structure or grid).

  • The work re examines the theosophical beliefs behind early Modernist Art in relation to dance, film and sculpture, exploring how the body becomes a symbol for the illusory 'artistic' reality between geometric and organic planes within the art object.






  • Art: Design: Interactive

  • A commission for the major Digital Art festival in Scotland, NEoN. "Bombaze" presented a playful way for the public to interact with augmented works of art located around the town of Dundee. Real-time data captured by the application helped the city understand the relevance and virtues of augmented works of art in unsuspecting neighbourhoods, which raised more doubts than answers.

  • The challenge of finding the complete set of augmented works of art was supported by printed media, clues were incorporated on a map and linked to the physical environment, creating a playful way for participants to discover the past and look to the future.

  • Urban spaces will soon be saturated with visible and hidden technologies that collect and transmit data. How we connect, interpret, and shape these data in our environment will be a significant challenge. This project explored where the online and offline world connects or disconnects, focusing on interactions with everyday communities and the little ideas that underpin the "big issues" that can often overwhelm researchers.


  • What follows is a short commentary on collaboration, that I recently presented at Central Saint Martins for the Communication Design Course Director Rebecca Wright.


  • Trust your instinct, never teach students not to trust, teach them to be brave enough to explore. Many students I come in contact with feel under pressure to prioritise skills and enhance employability above all else. However its important that lecturers and subject leaders help carve out a learning space protected from job prospects, where they can take chances, be encouraged to explore and experience what it is like to be a learner, be a researcher. but then also to have a duty not to neglect their career goals either.


  • Never stop looking, never stop sharing. As a teacher this means constantly looking at and coming up with alternative models for contributing to the delivery of design education practice. I look at the models coming out of Design departments such as ECAL, Basel school of Design, Eindhoven and Stuttgart. We are all working from the same blueprint and through our commitment to education we are all connected and all helping to build a better creative economy.


  • Make friends not contacts. Make true networks and meaningful relationships. Friendships always arise unhurriedly out of common interests and mutual approaches to practice. It was Bruce Mau who said 'Massive Change is not about the world of design; it’s about the design of the world.’ All the meaningful partnerships I have made believe in this potential for Design to bring about world change.


  • Listen. I believe the goal of good design is not to create good image but to communicate and to communicate you need to connect, and to connect you need to listen. We have to remember who we are working for and people are at the centre of it all, As creatives we have the capability to weave our designs seamlessly into the fabric of contemporary life, learning to listen and learning how to create shared narratives that bridge social space can help transform any campaign or any brand into a story and the people listening into it’s storytellers.


  • Understand the other side. Understand what the other side wants. Support students to navigate education, the industry, an audience, a career. As a lecturer this means examining future forms of education and bringing design education and the creative industries into closer partnerships. Learning ‘with’ not ‘from’, not replicating industry but instead supporting a platform where new forms of design education partnerships can happen, preparing our students to benefit from the industry they will one day inhabit. I see this as ‘a multiple stakeholder situation’. In which our department and students become an intermediary between community and business enterprise.


  • Be interested rather than interesting. I work this way because I love my job, it's much bigger than just getting the job done - its my life. I teach what I know and what I believe in. I embrace who I am and what I do best. Through embracing my passion within the studio it strengthens my practice and inspires in others. Teaching this way the world grows infinitely more enjoyable for myself and for my students, and because of this my professional practice, my teaching and my learning become an inclusive experience.


  • Embrace the next generation. Stay relevant and stay in touch. For me this means seeking out the opinions of students to help shape and change the face of design education. It also means learning from those that are ahead. Tony brooks from spin visited our department recently and told our graduates keen to get a place in the industry, that they need to have great type, great layout, great ideas, but if they come with code skills too then they are in straight away. Approaches to design which include creative coding and realtime graphical processes are very seductive to employers right now and this is something which we all must support.


  • Do it with others. Share your knowledge between departments, across disciplines, learn from these experiences, collaboration can achieve great things. DIWO is a term that started in the hands of indie magazine makers. I use the term here to draw attention to the need for designers to contribute and collaborate with others. I agree with Paula Scher, whilst speaking at Londons AGI conference she said, 'Design is social. Art is personal.' This suggests that through involving others in the design process, our projects can become more informed and more relevant to those it wishes to address.


  • Make it simpler but not simple. Make sure people understand what it is you are saying. As a student, as much as it is for a designer it is important to work from inside a familiar territory. When presenting an edited narrative to a client or for student assessment this means learning what not to say as much as what to say. Look out for what makes that winning formula and tease it into new forms.


  • Get Connected, then get unconnected, then get connected again. Something radical has happened, a few years ago everything became connected. and now everything in today’s world is about connectivity and it’s the incorporation of connectivity through design, through social media and social space, through participation and interaction that is fundamental to our ability to create, connect and deliver unforgettable experiences. And I would say its not even necessarily working towards finished outcomes that is the answer, but its the desire to connect through narrative, the joy of storytelling, the sharing of ideas and the process by which we arrive at a connection that is the most exciting to the world of Design right now.